PROFESSIONAL NERD.

PERSONAL BLOG.

What I'm Reading - 5/29/2018

What I'm Reading - 5/29/2018

Three to five links every weekday - 'Three, sir. Three!' edition.

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LOCATION-BASED VIRTUAL REALITY IS INCREASING ITS FOOTPRINT IN THE U.S.

Earlier this year, in a small, grey-walled storefront inside a very large mall in Torrance, Calif. (just past the AMC Center) , the virtual reality game-maker Survios planted its first flag in the market for location-based gaming.

It’s one of several companies (many based in Los Angeles) that are turning the city into a hub for anyone looking to experience the thrill of immersive gaming.

While Survios’  offering is more akin to the virtual arcades cropping up in cities across the country and around the world (including Dubai, New York, Seoul, and Tokyo),  other companies like the Los Angeles-based Two Bit Circus and Lindon, Utah’s The Void are creating site specific game experiences that promise a different kind of approach to virtual reality.


JEFF BEZOS AND HIS BLUE ORIGIN SPACE VENTURE GO ALL IN ON MOON SETTLEMENTS

Bezos laid out his vision for lunar settlement during a fireside chat with yours truly, which took place just after he received the National Space Society’s Gerard K. O’Neill Memorial Award.

In the short run, Blue Origin’s objective is to reduce the cost of access to space — initially with its New Shepard suborbital spaceship, and then with its orbital-class New Glenn rocket in the 2020s.

In the long run, Bezos’ vision is to smooth the way for millions of people working in space. Those people just might live and work inside huge spinning habitats — a concept that was proposed decades ago by O’Neill, a Princeton physicist whose ideas on space settlement fueled Bezos’ passion for the final frontier.


DEMAND FOR TV ADS 'HAS NEVER BEEN HIGHER,' AND IT COULD GIVE THE TV BUSINESS ONE LAST WINDFALL

Streaming is eating TV. Ratings for live, ad-supported shows continue to plummet. Netflix is set to make 1,000 original shows and movies this year. And the TV advertising business is set to have a killer year.

Counterintuitive it may be, but the just-kicked-off TV upfront selling period, that annual spring ritual during which TV networks sell the majority of their ad space, is expected to be robust. That's in spite of a growing number of Americans ditching scheduled-TV watching.

"Panelists were bullish on the TV Upfront," says a new report from UBS, which quizzed 40 major advertisers on their media spending plans for 2018. "Demand for high quality TV inventory has never been higher."

What I'm Reading - 5/30/2018

What I'm Reading - 5/30/2018

What I'm Reading - 5/25/2018

What I'm Reading - 5/25/2018